The perils of peremptory challenges

The right of the accused in a criminal prosecution to a trial by jury is enshrined in the Sixth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States of America. It is not only a declaration to the defendant that he has a right to a fair trial through the formation of an impartial jury composed…

Born in flames: social justice and the death penalty

It’s in the news: last week, a man ruthlessly murdered an entire family. The details of the crime are sickening, and the victims were innocent and well-loved. As you look at the murderer’s mugshot in the paper, you can’t help but wonder to yourself: how could someone commit such a cold-blooded crime? How could someone…

8 things I’ve learned from the Amicus death penalty training

At this year’s Autumn Amicus Death Penalty Training, 10 of us from King’s College London had the opportunity to take part in a course which was truly inspiring. Speakers from a number of backgrounds – barristers, solicitors and even exonerees – came together throughout two weekends at Pinsent Masons, to discuss the death penalty system…

Why we can Defend the Death Penalty but Oppose US Capital Punishment

Accountability, retribution and justice lie at the heart of our conception of punishment.  From the biblical days of ‘an eye for an eye’ to the modern commitment of proportionality, the idea that the guilty should receive a punishment befitting their crime is uncontroversial and widely held. It may arguably follow, that the punishment for a…

Amicus – why we do what we do

Amicus Reflections was created by the King’s College London Amicus Chapter – but what does Amicus mean, and what does it stand for?

Debris from military rule in Nigeria

It is no surprise that the period of military rule in Nigerian history resulted in detrimental effects to the contemporary system of Nigerian security and government.